Draining and Pressing

October 2, 2012

We’ve just completed our first red fermentation for the year, which means that it’s time to drain and press the Monte Rosso Zinfandel!

The purpose of draining and pressing the must is to separate the wine from the skins. During fermentation, carbon dioxide produced by the yeast floats the skins to the top of the tank, forming a mass of grape solids called a ‘cap’. Since most of the skins are in the top of the tank, the bottom of the tank is mostly wine.

Since the bottom of the tank is mostly wine, we begin by draining the wine out from under the cap. There are still some skins that come out with draining, so we pass the wine through a screen before we pump the wine to its receiving tank.

Once the tank is drained, we start digging out the skins and loading them into macro bins.

The bins we shovel the skins into are the same ones we use to pick grapes. We do this because these bins are easy to lift with the forklift, in turn making it easy to get the skins into the press. We got six bins of grape solids out of the Zinfandel this year, which was exactly enough for two press-loads.

As you can see, the skins are still pretty wet when they come out of the tank. Pressing gets the last bit of wine out of the skins.

It is possible to press the skins too hard, extracting harsh, bitter tannins into the wine. We use a very gentle pressing regime that extracts all of the best wine, while leaving the undesirable components behind.

We will be picking again soon, be sure to come back and see what we’re up to!

Amapola Creek is Richard Arrowoods’ latest winemaking project, to visit the Amapola Creek Winery main site, please click here.

 

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One Response to “Draining and Pressing”

  1. John Williams said

    How do you decide when to “end” the fermentation process? The glucose and fructose are primarily fermented, but do you not leave a small percentage to give the wine some sweetness when combined with the other nonfermented sugars? Do you monitor the alcohol content or do you measure the brix of the vat? I understand if this is propietary to your winery and you cannot share the specifics.

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