Breaking down the Bulk Cabernet Sauvignon

February 27, 2012

 

 

 

As you may recall, in 2011 we decided not to use all of our estate Cabernet Sauvignon in our own program, holding some of it back to sell in bulk to another winery (or wineries). For the last few months, we’ve been keeping this portion of the Cab in stainless steel tanks to let it clarify, cleaning it up fast so that it’s in a proper, saleable condition.

Last week we finished the final racking for this wine. We had left one of the tanks of this wine slightly partial while it was settling out, but now that that step is over we are going to break it down into topped up containers for storage.

Breaking wine down into topped containers is frequently difficult, because there are usually a number of different combinations of possible containers to use. In this case, we are primarily using some of our older barrels, with a little bit of the wine going into a stainless steel porta-tank.

The older barrels have already been used a number of times, so they will not impart any oak flavor to the wine, but they will allow the flavors and aromas already present in the wine to become more concentrated as water and alcohol evaporate out through the sides of the barrel.

On a completely unrelated note, while walking the vineyards today we found that the California Golden Poppies have started blooming!

These are the California state flower. 'Amapola' is Spanish for Poppy, so it's always noteworthy when our namesake starts to bloom in the vineyards.

To visit the Amapola Creek Winery main site, please click here.

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